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HTML5 Mobile Application Development

HAn HTML5 mobile app is basically a web page, or series of web pages, that are designed to work on a tiny screen. As such, HTML5 apps are device agnostic and can be opened with any modern mobile browser. And because your content is on the web, it's searchable, which can be a huge benefit depending on the app (shopping, for example). If you have experience developing Web apps, you'll take to HTML5 like a duck to water. If you're new to Web development, the technological bar is lower; it's easier to get started here than in native or hybrid development. Unfortunately, every mobile device seems to have their own idea of what constitutes usable screen size and resolution, and so there's an additional burden of testing on different devices. Browser incompatibility is especially rife on Android devices, so browser beware. HTML5 has emerged as a very popular way for building mobile applications. Multiple UI frameworks are available for solving some of the most complex problems that no developer wants to reinvent. iScroll does a phenomenal job of emulating momentum style scrolling. JQuery Mobile and Sencha Touch provide elegant mobile components, with hundreds if not thousands of plugins that offer everything from carousels to super elaborate controls.

Hybrid Mobile Applications

Hybrid development combines the best (or worst) of both the native and HTML5 worlds. We define hybrid as a web app, primarily built using HTML5 and JavaScript, that is then wrapped inside a thin native container that provides access to native platform features. PhoneGap is an example of the most popular container for creating hybrid mobile apps. For the most part, hybrid apps provide the best of both worlds. Existing web developers that have become gurus at optimizing JavaScript, pushing CSS to create beautiful layouts, and writing compliant HTML code that works on any platform can now create sophisticated mobile applications that don’t sacrifice the cool native capabilities. In certain circumstances, native developers can write plugins for tasks like image processing, but in cases like this, the devil is in the details. On iOS, the embedded web browser or the UIWebView is not identical to the Safari browser. While the differences are minor, they can cause debugging headaches. That’s why it pays off to invest in popular frameworks that have addressed all of the limitations.

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